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Professor Cho, Sungjae (조성재)

2014.12.15 16:13

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  • Position: Assistant Professor 
    Tel&office No: +82-42-350-2520 
    Fax: +82-42-350-2510 
    E-mail: sungjae.cho(at)kaist.ac.kr 
    Education: 2011: Univ. of Maryland at College Park (Ph.D in Physics)
    2005: Univ. of Virginia (M.S. in Physics)
    2003: Seoul National Univ. (B.S. in Physics) 
    Affiliation:  
    ResearchField: -Condensed Matter Experiment - Nanostructured Correlated Materials -Spintronic Devices 


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  • 2011 ~ 2014 :
  University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Postdoctoral Research Associate
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Experiments of charge and spin transport in low-dimensional (≤2D) devices to investigate the following:
  • quantum electron-dynamics arising from topological phases of matter
  • quantum phase transitions (QPTs) driven by large modulation of carrier densities
  • spin dynamics in chalcogenide nanostructures
  • newly-emerging physical properties and phases in heterostructures
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LAB : Quantum Transport Laboratory

Our lab studies quantum transport in nanostructured materials. We are particularly interested in topological phases of matter, quantum phase transitions, and spintronic properties in mesoscopic  van der Waals materials including graphene and layered chalcogenides. Van der Waals materials are easily processible into low-dimensional structures by mechanical exfoliation, and are expected to have many novel quantum properties, which remain poorly understood. Most recently nanostructured chalcogenides have attracted substantial interests because of the newly discovered topological phases of matter; i.e., phases characterized by topological invariants rather than broken symmetries. To create novel nanostructures from van der Waals materials, we employ state-of-the-art nano-fabrication techniques. Our ultimate goals are to understand quantum-mechanical effects in low-dimensional (≤2D) devices where phase coherence and electron-correlations are important, and eventually to develop novel quantum devices.